Make your own free website on Tripod.com
 WORKING BIBLIOGRAPHY

POTENTIAL INTRODUCTORY MATERIAL AND/OR MAJOR THEORIES

Craig, Patricia and Mary Cadogan. The Lady Investigates: Women Detectives and Spies in 
    Fiction. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1981.

[This book is unique in that it covers all female roles in detective novels, not just the role of detective. I found this book by performing a subject search for "feminist detective fiction" on the LUIS catalog.]

Cohn, Jan. Rev. of Detective Agency: Women Rewriting the Hard-Boiled Tradition, by Priscilla L.
    Walton and Manina Jones. American Literature 73.2 (2001): 435-6.

DeRosia, Margaret. Rev. of Detective Agency: Women Rewriting the Hard-Boiled Tradition, by
    Priscilla L. Walton and Manina Jones. Modernism/Modernity 7.3 (2000): 527-8.

Klein, Kathleen Gregory. The Woman Detective: Gender & Genre. Urbana: U of Illinois P, 1988.

[This book covers both British and American female detectives. It is organized chronologically, beginning with British policewomen in 1864 and ending with a discussion of the work of P.D. James. The book further discusses the Golden Age of Detective Fiction and the Hard-Boiled  school . Furthermore, the book is equipped with an extensive bibliography, which I plan to use to expand my research. I found this book by performing a title search on LUIS, after reading about it in Knepper's review of Munt's book.]

Knepper, Marty S. Rev. of Murder by the Book? Feminism and the Crime Novel, by Sally R.
    Munt. Modern Fiction Studies 42.1(1996): 232-4.

[This book review introduced me to Munt's book, as well to Klein's comparable book. Knepper compares the two works, and gives them both high ratings. I found this article on the MFS online journal by performing a keyword search.]

Reddy, Maureen T. Sisters in Crime: Feminism and the Crime Novels. New York: Continuum,
    1988.

[This book is an excellent source for uncovering general theories, because it discusses everything from Victorian serials to lesbian detectives in the 1980s. I found this book when searching the ISU library stacks for a similar book.]

Sayers, Dorothy L. Are Women Human? Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1971.

[This work by Sayers, a celebrated mystery novelist, is a speech delivered to a women's society in 1938. The work is valuable as a primary source because of Sayer's occupation and reputation. I plan to use this article to establish historical background on the place of women in fiction and society. I found this essay by contacting Randy Abbott, a librarian at UE who taught a class on women mystery writers.]

Winn, Dilys, comp. and ed. Murderess Ink: The Better Half of the Mystery. New York: Workman
    Publishing, 1979.

[This collection offers some creative looks at women writing mystery fiction, such as Agatha Christie, Anna Katharine Green and Margery Allingham. The book is a unique combination of general theories and specific explorations of certain authors and their works. I hope to use this book to establish the enormity of the genre. I found it while scanning the stacks of ISU's library.]

Young, Suzanne. "The Simple Art of Detection: The Female Detective in Victorian and
    Contemporary Mystery Novels." Modern Fiction Studies 47.2 (2001): 448-57.

[This is a review article that focuses primarily on two books, The Web of Iniquity: Early Detective Fiction by American Women by Catherine Ross Nickerson, and Detective Agency: Women Rewriting the Hard-boiled Tradition by Priscilla Walton and Manina Jones. The article goes into some detail about each book, and has helped narrow my own line of research. I found this article by searching the Humanities Index online for "feminist detective fiction." The article was available through the online journal.]

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHIES/BIBLIOGRAPHIES

Klein, Kathleen Gregory, ed. Great Women Mystery Writers: Classic to Contemporary. Westport:
    Greenwood Press, 1994.

[The editor of this work describes it in her preface as "a dictionary of classic and contemporary women mystery authors organized alphabetically..."This work offers general biographical and bibliographical information on women who wrote mysteries primarily in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. I hope to use this book to locate other research sources and to gain background information on each of the authors I will focus on. I found this book by accessing LUIS.]

AGATHA CHRISTIE AND ANNA KATHARINE GREEN: THE FIRST LADIES

Knepper, Marty S. "Reading Agatha Christie's Miss Marple Series: The Thirteen Problems." In
    the Beginning: First Novels in Mystery Series. Ed. Mary Jean DeMarr. Bowling Green:
    Bowling Green State U Popular Press, 1995.

[This essay is a critical analysis of Christie's Miss Marple. I intend to use it to establish the importance of Christie's work as a foundation for the new feminist mysteries. I found this essay by scanning through the book, which I had found by using a keyword search on LUIS.]

P.D. JAMES: THE NEW AGATHA CHRISTIE

Budd, Elaine. Thirteen Mistresses of Murder. New York: The Ungar Publishing Company, 1986.

[Chapter seven of this book is entitled, "P.D. James: Ordinary Lives, Extraordinary Deaths." I plan to use this chapter as a source of information on James's female detective, Cordelia Gray. I found this book by scanning the stacks at ISU's library.]

SUE GRAFTON: WEST COAST, HARD-BOILED P.I.

"Sue Grafton." Contemporary Authors Online. 20 September 2001. Gale Group. 2001
    <http://www.galenet.com>

SARA PARETSKY: URBAN, HARD-BOILED P.I.

Bakerman, Jane S. "Living ‘Openly and with Dignity'--Sara Paretsky's New-Boiled Feminist
    Fiction". Midamerica: The Yearbook of the Society for the Study of Midwestern Literature. 12
    (1985):120-35.

[This article offers a critical look at Paretsky's heroine. I plan to use this work to establish Paretsky as a leading figure in the world of feminist detective fiction, as well as to introduce other aspects of Paretsky's p.i., such as urban setting, guns, family, justice and morality. Finally, this article offers a contrast between Partesky and the Golden Age male novelists, like Chandler and Hammet. I obtained this source from Randy Abbott, the librarian who taught the women mystery writers class at the University of Evansville.]

PATRICIA CORNWELL AND J.D. ROBB: FURTHER EXPANSIONS OF DETECTIVE FICTION(MEDICINE AND ROMANCE)

PRIMARY SOURCES
[This section will include a list of novels written by Agatha Christie, Anna Katharine Green, P.D. James, Sue Grafton, Sara Paretsky, Patricia Cornwell and J.D. Robb.]